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The Story of Mother’s Day

The Story of Mother’s Day

The Story of Mother’s Day

The Story of Mother’s Day

Preface - A Note From A New Mom
 
For as long as I can remember, I have always wanted children.  But when my husband and I started planning our family, we had no idea how long and hard our journey to parenthood would turn out to be. 
 
Getting pregnant was a battle against infertility that we both fought together, hand in hand, every single day. Those were tough times, and I can only be thankful that we made it to the other side. 
 
We now have a sweet 4-month-old, and bub and I will be celebrating our very first Mother’s Day this year!
 
To be honest for me Mother’s Day will always be the day I became a mother, but as I - well actually mostly my husband -  plan a Mother’s Day treat, I cannot help but wonder how it all started? 
 
Because of the difficulties we went through to get pregnant, Mother’s Day will always have its own special meaning to me. But as my husband and I plan a special Mother’s Day treat, it makes me wonder what Mother’s Day means to other moms, and how the whole tradition got started?
 
So, I did a little investing and this is what I found out...

 

 
While the concept of honoring mothers has been around since ancient times – Greeks, Romans and early Christians have all had their versions of Mother’s Day - what we celebrate now on every second Sunday of May was all because of one woman, an American named Anna Jarvis.
 
Anna loved her mother and was a devoted daughter. After her mother passed, Anna decided to dedicate her life to honor her mother’s memory. Anna organized a remembrance ceremony in a church in Grafton, Pennsylvania, which is now recognized as the very first Mother’s Day, heldon the second Sunday of May, 1905. 
 
(I love the fact that a loving daughter started Mother's Day for her mother!)
 
After that, Anna and her supporters carried out a vigorous letter-writing campaign to lobby congressional leaders. In 1908, congress rejected the proposal, joking that they would also have to proclaim a “mothers-in-law” day. But Anna persevered, and In 1914, her efforts finally paid off, and president Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation designating Mother's Day, held on the second Sunday in May, as a national holiday to honor mothers.
 
Anna had a very clear vision of what the day should mean: she wanted it to be a day when children visited their Mothers and honored their sacrifices. Naturally, as the greeting-card companies and florists moved in to cash in on the event, they incurred her wrath. Anna spent decades fighting against the commercialization of the holiday., but without much success. Todayl, no Mother’s Day seems complete without a card and a bouquet. 

So, here I am, more than a 100 years after Anna first remembered her mother with white carnations, ordering flowers for my mother and getting ready to celebrate a little Mother’s Day picnic with my baby daughter. 
 
Diving into Anna’s story made me think about my relationship with my mother. It made me realize how much I take my mother for granted. For me, my mom is the one person with whom I can be myself – no barriers, no pretense – completely safe in the knowledge that she will always love me. Apart from all the years of hard work and sacrifice, my mom’s biggest gift to me was the freedom to be myself. 
 
But looking at my own baby now, I finally understand that all the self-sacrifice - like the kind my own mother went through - is a reward in itself. There is so much I have already given my new daughter - and not just time and love and attention, but plans for her future, like banking her cord blood with Evercord and planning for college. Yet it doesn’t feel like sacrifice to me. It doesn’t feel like a burden.
 
It feels like motherhood. It feels like love.

 

 

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